Anger, Contempt & Disgust Indicators of Violence & Dangerous Intent: Risk Prevention

“Among leaders of groups that committed aggressive acts, there was a significant increase in expressions of anger, contempt and disgust from 3 to 6 months prior to the group committing an act of violence. For nonviolent groups, expressions of anger, contempt and disgust decreased from 3 to 6 months prior to the group staging an act of peaceful resistance.” – Read the full article here.

Dangerous intent. It’s an interesting term, which could also referred to as dangerous demeanor, threatening behaviour – and in some examples – intimidation. When it comes to human beings causing psychological or physical harm to one another I find myself sitting in the camp of risk prevention. As a martial artist I promote awareness and a respectful wariness of those demonstrating unusual or even hostile behaviour – a preventative or protective habit – with the back up “risk management system” firmly in place that I call self defence. To illustrate what I mean, a number of years ago a good friend of mine was drunk on his first night in Bangkok and staggered down a dark alley by himself and was subsequently mugged, with thankfully only his pride being hurt. A year or so later another friend of mine who knew about the incident and that I did martial arts asked me; “What would you have done in that situation?” My simple response was; “I wouldn’t have been there,” which really meant – I would not have been drunk in an alley by myself at night in a foreign country. Avoidance of risk – mainly dangerous risk – to me is just plain common sense.

There are plenty of reasons in learning to identify emotions in others (see this page for a long list) – and from a preventative perspective of risk – I would suggest learning to identify emotions is essential. The next step is to learn to identify threatening or suspicious body language.

This is a BBC video of the alleged bomber in Bulgaria 19th July 2012;  can you spot some pre-event indicators:

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About Stu Dunn

Stu Dunn, Founder of SDL Behavioural Science Consultancy and Head Consultant, International Speaker, FACS Certified, Micro Expressions, Body Language & Deception Detection Expert. Stu Dunn is the first Facial Action Coding System (FACS) Certified consultant in New Zealand. Stu has had a natural interest in human behaviour and non verbal communication for most of his life. Stu's continued study of psychology, body language, micro expressions and FACS has helped him become New Zealand's leading expert in micro expressions, emotional surveillance and FACS (FACS is the most detailed de-coding of the face, and universally recognized by psychologists and physiologists worldwide). Stu is also one of the first in the world to achieve Master Level on Humintell's Mix Elite Micro Expressions software. Stu has been studying body language since 2001, and has worked with participants from New Zealand, Australia, United States, United Kingdom, India, Canada, Germany, Afghanistan, Portugal, Switzerland, Poland, Macedonia and Sri Lanka so far. This includes working with participants from the NZ Defence, IRD Fraud Investigators, Sri Lankan Customs, Homeland Security, Telecom NZ and Vodafone to name a few. Stu's areas of expertise include: micro expressions, emotions and emotional surveillance, body language, deception, interviewing, training, business consulting, video analysis (evaluating truthfulness & credibility), FACS coding (videos, pictures and animation), sales training, assistance with criminal and private investigations.
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2 Responses to Anger, Contempt & Disgust Indicators of Violence & Dangerous Intent: Risk Prevention

  1. Pingback: Another Teen Murderer, Watch For The Signs | The Blog for Stu Dunn

  2. Pingback: Erik Hanson - Ignorant About the Law, Ignorant About a Lot

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